The Control of Nature by John A. McPhee

By John A. McPhee

The keep watch over of Nature is John McPhee's bestselling account of locations the place individuals are locked in strive against with nature. Taking us deep into those contested territories, McPhee info the strageties and strategies in which humans try and regulate nature. such a lot outstanding is his depiction of the most contestants: nature in advanced and notable guises, and people trying to wrest regulate from her - obdurate, occasionally foolhardy, extra usually inventive, and consistently arresting characters.

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The Control of Nature

The regulate of Nature is John McPhee's bestselling account of areas the place everyone is locked in wrestle with nature. Taking us deep into those contested territories, McPhee information the strageties and strategies in which humans try to keep watch over nature. such a lot notable is his depiction of the most contestants: nature in complicated and outstanding guises, and people trying to wrest keep watch over from her - obdurate, occasionally foolhardy, extra usually inventive, and regularly arresting characters.

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Table of contents
Cover

Contents

Sponsors

Introduction

ANZANG Nature Photographer of the yr – 2012Overall Winner

ANZANG Nature Photographer of the yr – 2012Portfolio Prize

Animal Behaviour

Animal Portrait

Botanical Subject

Underwater Subject

wasteland Landscape

Threatened Species

Black and White

Interpretive

Our Impact

Junior

Acknowledgements

Into Africa

Craig Packer takes us into Africa for a trip of fifty-two days within the fall of 1991. yet this is often greater than a travel of terrific animals in an unique, far off position. A box biologist on the grounds that 1972, Packer begun his paintings learning primates at Gombe after which the lions of the Serengeti and the Ngorongoro Crater together with his spouse and colleague Anne Pusey.

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Whenever they do so, though, they risk losing water through the process of transpiration. Lewisia are good at avoiding water loss due in part to their thick, succulent leaves that store water in much the same way as a cactus. Even more Flagship Species 35 remarkably, Lewisia open their leaf pores at night to take in CO2 when the risk of water loss is minimal. The pores are then closed during the day when there is the highest danger of water loss due to high temperatures. The plants are doing part of their photosynthesis at night — something of a contradiction, since by definition photo‑ synthesis is driven by light energy.

A bear of such dimensions would have been a formidable adversary when met on the open prairie with the limited firepower possessed by Lewis and Clark. Indeed, such encounters would likely have an outcome much less favorable than that described by Lewis on May 5, 1805: Capt. Clark and Drewyer killed the largest brown bear this eve‑ ning which we have yet seen. it was a most tremendious looking anamal, and extreemly hard to kill notwithstanding he had five balls through his lungs and five others in various parts he swam more than half the distance across the river to a sandbar & it was at least twenty minutes before he died; he did not attempt to attact, but fled and made the most tremendous roaring from the moment he was shot.

A bear of such dimensions would have been a formidable adversary when met on the open prairie with the limited firepower possessed by Lewis and Clark. Indeed, such encounters would likely have an outcome much less favorable than that described by Lewis on May 5, 1805: Capt. Clark and Drewyer killed the largest brown bear this eve‑ ning which we have yet seen. it was a most tremendious looking anamal, and extreemly hard to kill notwithstanding he had five balls through his lungs and five others in various parts he swam more than half the distance across the river to a sandbar & it was at least twenty minutes before he died; he did not attempt to attact, but fled and made the most tremendous roaring from the moment he was shot.

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